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6-HUM17

Engineer your own tool

Human Health and Behavior
Trinity Ann Dean

Grade:
6
Teacher:
Bryan Minson

Directions: We have learned that tools were created to make life/work/tasks easier in ancient times. We still have plenty of tools in our daily lives, but now it is your turn to design a tool. Engineer your own tool Directions: We have learned that tools were created to make life/work/tasks easier. We still have plenty of tools in our daily lives, but now it is your turn to engineer a tool. Rules! No electricity No batteries Must be made by hand (no factories) No plastic or glass Wood/bone/leather/stone/ natural plant material- only MUST have a purpose in the modern world… (SARSEF PRESENTATION) MUST be a new invention or an improved replica of a primary source (no hammers, knives, or bow and arrows) NO SHARP OBJECTS. NO WEAPONS FOR YOUR TOOL, YOU MUST BRING TO SCHOOL IN A BOX, BAG, OR SOME SORT OF CARRYING DEVICE. IF NOT, YOU WILL LOSE ½ OF THE TOTAL POINTS POSSIBLE. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary source es.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.


Project presentation

View Project Presentation file

2 thoughts on “Engineer your own tool

  1. What a good question – why rings? Instead of necklaces, bracelets, something else? Now I want to research that too!

    Clearly, there’s lots of design work involved in making an object to fit, stay on, and not irritate a finger – I better understand the complexity now that you point it out.

    I hope you stay curious and continue researching and designing objects that add meaning to our lives!

  2. Excellent consideration of project implications and directions for the future! Great work!

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